LADZ (John Arsenault and Adrian Gilliand,) Eden #31, 2012. Chromogenic color print, 32 × 52½ inches. Courtesy of the artists.

Art AIDS America, Chicago

WHY? GLAD YOU ASKED.

[quote]The AIDS epidemic started out more than 30 years ago as a rumor. Then, proceeded to spread uncertainty, fear, and death as a virus few knew much about, dividing people, the country, and eventually the whole world.  A real social and medical issue, AIDS, has been painfully present in the American (and global) art world. Find out more about the deep and unforgettable presence of HIV in American Art in a historical survey/educational/political experience spanning works from the early 1980’s to the present, through the complex lenses of sex,  beauty,  loss,  and courage. Because  it is about time.[/quote]

 

Andres Serrano (born 1950,) Blood and Semen III, 1990. Chromogenic color print, edition 1 of 4, 40 × 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

Andres Serrano (born 1950,) Blood and Semen III, 1990. Chromogenic color print, edition 1 of 4, 40 × 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

David Wojnarowicz (born 1954, died 1992), Untitled (Buffalo), 1988–89. Vintage gelatin silver print, signed on verso, 28⅝ × 35¾ inches. Collection of Michael Sodomick, Courtesy of the Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W Gallery, New York.

David Wojnarowicz (born 1954, died 1992), Untitled (Buffalo), 1988–89. Vintage gelatin silver print, signed on verso, 28⅝ × 35¾ inches. Collection of Michael Sodomick, Courtesy of the Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P.P.O.W Gallery, New York.

Tino Rodriguez (born 1965,) Eternal Lovers, 2010. Oil on wood, 18 × 24 inches. Private collection. Photo courtesy of the artist.

Tino Rodriguez (born 1965,) Eternal Lovers, 2010. Oil on wood, 18 × 24 inches. Private collection. Photo courtesy of the artist.

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Joey Terrill (born 1955), Still Life with Forget-Me-Nots and One Week’s Dose of Truvada, 2012. Mixed media on canvas, 36 × 48 inches. Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, Foundation purchase. Photo courtesy of Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art.

Joey Terrill (born 1955), Still Life with Forget-Me-Nots and One Week’s Dose of Truvada, 2012. Mixed media on canvas, 36 × 48 inches. Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, Foundation purchase. Photo courtesy of Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art.

About the Author /

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An art critic and pop culture journalist with a BA in English Lit, a MA in Media and another in Art Journalism. Believes in fierce creativity and the beauty of being weird. She’s all about gallery hopping. Writes better with wine.